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Centrifugal Pumps

Oberdorfer Centrifugal pumps are of the single stage and end suction. Models use open vane style and enclosed style impellers. Centrifugals convert driver energy to kinetic energy in a liquid by accelerating it to the outer rim of a revolving impeller. Since the amount of energy given to the liquid corresponds to the velocity at the impeller vane tip, the faster the impeller revolves (or the bigger the impeller is), the higher the velocity of the liquid at the vane tip and the greater the energy transferred to the liquid. In comparison to positive displacement devices, centrifugals are quieter and require no relief valve to protect the pumps from pressure build-up.

These pumps contain few moving parts resulting in less wear and less maintenance. Our centrifugal family models are constructed out of bronze, which is ideal in marine applications and for handling harsh solvents. Our centrifugal pumps provide up to 20 feet of suction lift and can handle most difficult solvents with the proper fluoroelastomer or Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) seal. Several of our centrifugal models are self-priming.

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Low Flow 9 GPM - 25 GPM

Medium Flow 52.5 GPM - 100 GPM

Max Flow 102 GPM - 105 GPM

Plastic Centrifugal

Self Priming Centrifugal

What is a Centrifugal Pump

A centrifugal pump is a rotodynamic pump that uses a rotating impeller to increase the pressure and flow rate of a fluid. Centrifugal pumps are the most common type of pump used to move liquids through a piping system. The fluid enters the pump impeller along or near to the rotating axis and is accelerated by the impeller, flowing radially outward or axially into a diffuser or volute chamber, from where it exits into the downstream piping system.

Centrifugal pumps are most often associated with the radial flow type. However, the term "centrifugal pump" can be used to describe all impeller type rotodynamic pumps including the radial, axial and mixed flow variations.

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